Reflections From An Old WoSARS Young-Yin!

By Hugh Cummings GM0HSC (WoSARS Past Member)

Dragging up some old memories:

Along with a number of the other younger amateurs around Glasgow, we set up a group specifically aimed at younger folks, and people new to the hobby, called YAGIS – the Young Amateurs Group In Scotland. One area of interest saw us partake in conversion of assorted PMR sets, to get cheap access to the bands, where commercial kit wasn’t available, including a batch of Pye Cambridges on 4m AM, then converting them (badly) to FM. We ended  with D3E – pretty much!

PYE Cambridge – Hybrid Mobile Tx/Rx (Valve Tx Transistor Rx)

A lesson was learned about shorting out valve grids with a screwdriver I remember, and simultaneously, that electric current flows from a person to another touching person – ouch!

I used to use aircraft scatter to make a 4m qso between David – then GM7BPA (who was a runner up in the young amateur of the year contest I think?) in Croftamie and myself in Mansewood Glasgow. 2m was fine but 4m needed an aircraft approaching the airport over Duntocher for the path to work 🙂

We also ran fox hunts, and many hill-top operations, with all sorts or mobile trips up hills in Ayrshire and the southern Highlands. I also remember a VHF field day above East Kilbride and special event station GB0BUS using a double decker bus I had at the time.

Hugh’s Current Bus – Fares Please! (COX)

I went on to become the senior novice licence instructor for Strathclyde and along with Tommy GM3VBT and Susan GM4SGB, we trained somewhere in the region of 30 mainly young people at novice level, with many going on to get Class B and Class A licences – including young folk from the High School of Glasgow and St Aloysius’ College – one of whom went on to be the lead guitarist in Indy band  MOGWAI  (Almost a callsign – COX).

Another memorable adventure was a mini dxpedition to ACHILL ISLAND in Co Mayo in Ireland IO43………..

View of Achill Island using NASA’s technology overhead

…………..where we got special permission from the Ministry to operate as EJ4VNX on 50MHz as well as on 70MHz, and the other bands. We picked a great week for it (as we had researched the likelihood) and from day 2, had almost constant day time E openings to mainland Europe.

Great times.

Best regards to all at WoSARS for your forthcoming 50th Celebrations.

Shug GM0HSC – a Old Young Yin!

Did Brazilian Priest Precede Fessenden & Marconi With Audio Tx ?

Father Roberto Landell de Moura (January 21, 1861 – June 30, 1928), commonly known as Roberto Landell, was a Brazilian Roman Catholic priest and inventor. He is best known for his work developing long-distance audio transmissions, using a variety of technologies, including an improved megaphone device, photophone (using light beams) and radio signals.

It was reported in June 1899 that he had successfully transmitted audio over a distance of 7 kilometers (4.3 miles),  which was followed by a second, public, demonstration on June 3, 1900. A lack of technical details makes it uncertain which sending technology was being used, however, if radio signals were employed, then these would be the earliest reported audio transmissions by radio. Landell received patents in Brazil and the United States during the first decade of the 1900s.

For more information – HERE .

Dave GM3WIL – SK

Copied off GM13 Forum.  Also checkout QRZ.com.

 

11:43   
It is with tears in my eys to report the my best mate Dave GM3WIL passed away last night due to a massive heart attack. RIP Pal.
Roy
GM4VKI

12:44   
Sad to hear that Roy. I didn’t know Dave very well but my thoughts go
out to his friends and family especially as a funeral will be so
different and difficult at these times.Andy
MM0FMF

Oh no – this is tragic. I’ve known Dave from away back in the 70’s when we were both experimenting on 2M – specifically Auroral contacts.

My last chats with him seem to reassure me that he had made a good recovery for the previous underlying heart problems. It appears not to have been the case?

As I’ve said – tragic and sad, and we’ll miss his ‘quirky’ experimentation. A true amateur (:>(

14:37   

 

In message <0a5w.1585997020047929611.qLF7@groups.io>, Roy – GM4VKI via
groups.io <rkavampsev=aol.com@groups.io> writes

It is with tears in my eys to report the my best mate Dave GM3WIL
passed away last night due to a massive heart attack. RIP Pal.
Roy
GM4VKI

I’m sorry to hear that; I knew he had health problems. I’ve known him
since I lived in Troon some considerable time ago. I was chatting to him
at Galashiels in October. Worked him many times on 4m and 2m.

Brian GM4DIJ

Brian Howie

Shepparton & District ARC Use Radio Australia’s Curtain Array

Radio Australia Array

Over the weekend  of 14th and 15th of March, the Shepparton & District ARC will connect amateur transceivers to the curtain array and rhombic antennae at the Broadcast Australia site in Shepparton, which is located in North Central Victoria, Australia. This location was previously a short wave Radio Australia broadcast site. VI3RA will be on the air from 2300UTC next Saturday the 14th of March until 2300UTC on the 16th using the 7, 10, 14, 18 and 21MHz bands.

For further information go to QRZ.com and checkout VI3RA.

Where Did 73 Come From?

_ _ . . .  . . . _ _

 

The Telegraphist’s Office

 

Glen Zook, K9STH, posted this to the Heathkit mailing list:

Many amateurs already know that “73” is from what is known as the “Phillips Code”, a series of numeric messages conceived for the purpose of cutting down transmission time on the old land telegraph systems when sending text that is basically the same.In the April 1935 issue of QST on page 60 there is a short article on the origin of 73. This article was a summation of another article that appeared in the “December Bulletin from the Navy Department Office of the Chief of Naval Operations”. That would be December of 1934.

The quotation from the Navy is as follows: “It appears from a research of telegraph histories that in 1859 the telegraph people held a convention, and one of its features was a discussion as to the saving of ‘line time’. A committee was appointed to devise a code to reduce standard expressions to symbols or figures. This committee worked out a figure code, from figure 1 to 92. Most of these figure symbols became obsolescent, but a few remain to this date, such as 4, which means “Where shall I go ahead?’. Figure 9 means ‘wire’, the wire chief being on the wire and that everyone should close their keys. Symbol 13 means ‘I don’t understand’; 22 is ‘love and a kiss’; 30 means ‘good night’ or ‘the end’. The symbol most often used now is 73, which means ‘my compliments’ and 92 is for the word ‘deliver.’ The other figures in between the forgoing have fallen into almost complete disuse.”

One of the chief telegraphers of the Navy Department of Communications, a J. L. Bishop, quoted from memory the signals that were in effect in 1905:

1 Wait a minute
4 Where shall I start in message?
5 Have you anything for me?
9 Attention or clear the wire
13 I do not understand
22 Love and kisses
25 Busy on another circuit
30 Finished, the end-used mainly by press telegraphers
73 My compliments, or Best Regards
92 Deliver

Now days, 22 has become 88 (love and kisses). I don’t know when this came about. 30 is still used in the newspaper and magazine business to indicate the end of a feature, story, or column. And, of course, 73 is still used by amateur radio operators to mean “best regards”.Making any of these numbers plural (73s, 88s, etc.) is incorrect since they are already plural. 73s would mean best regardses and 88s would mean love and kisseses. Those make no sense.

Anyway, the subject of where 73 came from comes up periodically and this article reinforces the “Phillips Code” origin.

Jim, N2EY, adds:

Some other related stuff:Phillips Code “19” and “31” refer to train orders. They were so well known that the terms “19 order” and “31 order” were still in RR use in the 1970s, long after the telegraph was gone.

The abbreviation “es” for “and” derives from the Morse character “&”. The prosign “SK” with the letters run together derives from the Morse “30”.

The numeric code is a small part of the abbreviations outlined in the Phillips Code (developed by telegrapher Walter P. Phillips). Here are the numbers as referenced:

W I R E S I G N A L S

WIRE Preference over everything except 95
1 Wait a moment
2 Important Business
3 What time is it?
4 Where shall I go ahead?
5 Have you business for me?
6 I am ready
7 Are you ready?
8 Close your key; circuit is busy
9 Close your key for priorit business (Wire chief, dispatcher, etc)
10 Keep this circuit closed
12 Do you understand?
13 I understand
14 What is the weather?
15 For you and other to copy
17 Lightning here
18 What is the trouble?
19 Form 19 train order
21 Stop for a meal
22 Wire test
23 All copy
24 Repeat this back
25 Busy on another wire
26 Put on ground wire
27 Priority, very important
28 Do you get my writing?
29 Private, deliver in sealed envelope
30 No more (end)
31 Form 31 train order
32 I understand that I am to …
33 Car report (Also, answer is paid for)
34 Message for all officers
35 You may use my signal to answer this
37 Diversion (Also, inform all interested)
39 Important, with priority on thru wire (Also, sleep-car report)
44 Answer promptly by wire
73 Best regards
88 Love and kisses
91 Superintendant’s signal
92 Deliver promptly
93 Vice President and General Manager’s signals
95 President’s signal
134 Who is at the key

Museum Ships Weekend – 1st & 2nd June – 2019

Ms Hoogeveen  M827 / PI4MRC &- SS Rotterdam/ PI4HAL During the weekend of 1 and 2 June, the Museum Ships Weekend will be held again. From all kinds of old and special ships, the amateur bands are broadcast worldwide to enable unique QSOs.

It’s not a contest; that means that it is possible to switch to the WARC bands if required.All information about the participating ships and about a certificate to be obtained, can be found on the following website  https://www.qsl.net/w/wa2tvs//museum

There is also such a special ship in Den Helder, the former mine sweeper Hr. Ms Hoogeveen. From the time the ships were still made of wood and the guys were made of steel. From the time that the Navy had a large mine service to keep our ports and shipping routes free from the mines that had been laid during the Second World War.

56442049_1299357406872201_6952217854993235968_n.jpg

Hr. Ms Hoogeveen  M827 Launched during May 1956 and retired from service in 1994, De Hoogeveen,  moored at the quay of Willemsoord (former Rijkswerf) in Den Helder,  is now managed, refurbished and maintained by the Friends of the Royal Netherlands Navy. Together with all volunteers and donors, they are committed to preserving this ship as a cultural heritage.  The Marine Radio Amateur Club (Marac) have succeeded in returning the radio cabin to its original working state.

To mark the occasion, it was decided this year to take part in the Museum Ships Weekend from Hoogeveen. The call sign which Hoogeveen uses is PI4MRC and broadcasts are mainly on HF bands, in all modes and 2 x 24 hours. PI4MRC is the clubstation of MARAC (Marine Radio Amateur Club), The Clubstation of the Dutch Naval Radio Amateur Club.Given the list of participating ships, Hoogeveen is in good company. The SS Rotterdam will  participate under the call sign PI4HAL from Rotterdam. 29/03/2019/ in General News / by Fred Verburgh PA0FVHhttps://www.veron.nl/nieuws/museum-ships-weekend-1-en-2-juni

PI4HAL – SS Rotterdam 60 years ago, on September 13, 1958 the SS Rotterdam was launched  in Rotterdam.PI4HAL is the call-sign of the amateur radio (aka Ham radio) station, active on board the former cruise steamship (SS) Rotterdam, permanently moored in Rotterdam. PI4HAL will participate in the festivities by using a special callsign between October 2018 and October 2019  to celebrate this anniversary. PI4HAL operators will be active with Morse telegraphy and give demonstrationshttp://www.pi4hal.nl