Janet K0JE and Janice K0JA – Ham Radio Twins

The 86-year-old identical twins studied electrical engineering and worked for pioneering computer companies at a time when few women had careers in STEM fields.

Janet and Janice Robidoux, have stuck together through a lifetime of adventures, which include building and racing canoes, driving RVs to every state and studying STEM [ANTRANIK TAVITIAN, STAR TRIBUNE]

They’ve travelled the world via the airwaves as avid ham radio operators, a hobby they took up in their teens…………..Read MORE .

Come And Join Us On The ICQPodcast Digital Group

The ICQPodcast is the proud owner of a digital talk group.

Accessible on many modes linked together through the ICQPodcast gateway, you can talk to your friends, fellow listeners and even your favourite ICQPodcast Presenter!

Even if you don’t own a digital radio, you can still get involved using either a smartphone app or listen in like a shortwave listener.

Find out more about the ICQPodcast DMR Group – https://www.icqpodcast.com/icqpodcast-digital-voice-talk-group

ICQPodcast DMR Group FAQ – https://www.icqpodcast.com/icqpodcast-dmr-faqs

73 ICQPodcast Team

Stories Behind The Faces – Sabina Dermota S53YL

Gallery/Post
Story Behind The Faces: SABINA DERMOTA – S53YL – CLICK for QSL Card & QRZ

The documentary film Stories behind the faces: Sabina Dermota tells a story about a blind woman called Sabina Dermota. She is blind from her birth but blindness was never an obstacle for her. With extraordinary will and love for life and new experiences Sabina Dermota lives a full and fulfilling life. She skies, she went rafting on the alpine river Soča, she even went paragliding………..

Click HERE for Video and more information.

A Ham For 63 Years

A Ham for 63 years – by Carol Fraley Laferty – K4SAF

My ham shack has been upgraded to my dream She-Shack, and I am having more fun in ham radio than I have had since a teenager.  I have been operating the digital modes for two years almost, and during the Corona Virus Pandemic I set some amateur radio goals.  I have accomplished more during this time than I ever dreamed possible.  I have finished DXCC, and received Worked All States on 160, 80, 40, 30, 20, 17, and 15, Mixed, Digital and CW.  I need only AK and WY on 10 meters. Thanks to all in the ham community all around the world for helping me achieve this.  I was never interested in completing these awards until now.

The hardest award for me to get has been the YLRL WAS YL (Worked All States).  I need only MT and RI now to complete it.  Many more of the licensed YLs need to get on the air more often.

I was 15 when I got my license in 1957 and will be celebrating my 64th year as a ham on 9/28/2021.  My brother, Fred Fraley, W4CHK > AA4FF > W4DF, who is now a Silent Key, was instrumental in getting me on the air. He taught me the code and shared his shack willingly with his younger sister.  I have kept the same call all my years on the air. My late father also got his license at the same time I did and was K4SAB.

I met my husband Don Laferty, K4GFY via radio in 1957. He is also now a Silent Key.  We talked for three years on cw and phone before we actually met in person.  We had been married for 53 years when he passed in 2015. Our son Don Laferty, Jr., who lives in Wisconsin, now has his Dad’s call, K4GFY.

I am a retired high school Business and Computer teacher. I also taught part-time in the CIS Dept at Morehead State University.  I am active in the Young Ladies Radio League (YLRL) and was the   U.S./Canada Receiving Treasurer for 11 years.  I enjoy seeing my YLRL and ham friends at Dayton Hamvention and at our national YLRL convention, which is held every 3 years.

I am also a member of QCWA, SKCC, and FISTS, and our local radio club, Morehead Amateur Radio Society, in Morehead, KY.  I received my Extra class in 2000, just before the 20 wpm code requirement was dropped. Hope to see you on the bands or possibly on Facebook.

QCWA  Quarter Century Wireless Association
SKCC Straight Key Century Club
FISTS  The International Morse Preservation Society

Slow Down To Bust A Contest Pileup

Slow down to bust a contest pileup – Observations By DAN KB6NU

In the Minnesota QSO Party last weekend, there was a big pileup trying to work a station in some remote county. The operator was working about 23 – 25 wpm, so I replied at that speed. I even sped up a little thinking that I might be able to slip my call in before the others.

Well, after several unsuccessful calls, and hearing the MN station reply to several slower stations, I decided to slow down myself. Bingo! I got a reply to my first call at the slower speed. My guess is that the slower speed made my call easier to copy and to stand out from the others. I don’t know if this tactic would work in a bigger contest, but I’m going to use this tactic again in a future QSO party.

Copy CW Signals More Easily With Two Tones

By –

In CQ – January 2018 – Pete, N8PR (SK) wrote that you should set up your receiver to produce two tones 65 to 80 Hz apart to make copying weak CW signals more easily. The theory behind this is that the dissonance between the two tones makes copying a CW signal more copyable than just a single tone. I like this  idea. I played around a little bit last night with this technique, and it did indeed seem to work better than using just a single tone.

Read original POST – HERE .

Cambodia (XU) Gets On The ‘Air’

 

Cambodian Amateur Radio Club

Some years ago unknown Koreans amateur radio operators left behind a very complete set of ham radio equipment and antennas at  the National Polytechnic Institute of Cambodia (NPIC) near Phnom Penh. This great shack was sitting idle for some years until the Engineering Service Team of FEBC,  through  locally resident engineer, Mike Adams  (XU7AJA/KH0AS) made contact with the school.

NPIC thought it might help interest students in radio careers if an amateur radio club could be started and the shack brought back into operation, which is how the NPIC Amateur Radio Club was born. Since anyone can be behind the mic as long as a properly licensed control operator is present, lots of professors and students got to spend time on the radios.The radio club has been active in contests, using Adams’ XU7AJA call sign.

FEBC International – Engineering Service Team  held the first ARRL VEC Amateur Radio examination session in Cambodia  on April 5.2018.
FEBC – Far East Broadcasting Company)  an association of local broadcast ministries.

For further information checkout: https://guychrisfebc.blog/tag/npic/